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Be The Dream

Spectrum Academy

Business Plan

 

 

 

 


 

Abstract

Our youth of today look at the educational system and ask, "Why?" They look at the values of their parents and say, "That's not for me!" They laugh at the political machinery, see how environmental and social concerns are few, and say, "Nothing is working." They live with hopelessness in a love-starved world and feel, "What's the use?"  So begins the life of abuse in all its ugly forms. Warehousing of youths within the social systems only continues this disempowerment. They take it out on themselves without knowing what they are doing or why, causing social issues of near epidemic proportions in our burgeoning cities and an overload for our courts, educational and social service systems. Can we find collective answers and implement solutions? We believe so.

Visionary insights and perspectives lead to paradigm changes in society. Currently, the situation regarding at-risk youth is cumbersome and oblique in regards to understanding the ‘big picture’ and the solutions necessary to empower change in our youth. As a society, we are failing to address critical needs of our youth. Recidivism within the youth correctional and social service programs, evidenced by the high concern of State officials across the nation, needs our collective attention now. We need a program that synergizes available resources and rallies the public spirit toward a new approach to empowering change within the disenfranchised youth caught in the cycles of rebellion and rejection.

Experience and research have shown that these three components- charter school, residential treatment center, and community technology center- can indeed work as one, which can profoundly affect youth in positive directions. Spectrum Academy, as a learning organization, uses a holistic systems thinking approach toward education. The programs meet the emotional and intellectual needs of the youth, which allows the person to grow and the student to learn the value of their education. The need for implementation of a better approach is obvious to those within the system. This business plan details a high-level framework and action plan that takes initiative. Spectrum Academy is ingenious, innovative, and timely for our youth.

 

Namaste,

Bruce ‘Zen’ Benefiel, MBA, MAOM

Robin J. Engel, BAEd, MAOM

 


 

Table of Contents

Abstract

Executive Summary.

Invitation.

Situational Analysis.

Strategic Objectives.

Keys to Success.

Company Background.

Company Ownership.

Deliverables.

Locations and Facilities.

Key Products and Services.

Description.

Competitive Comparison.

Sales Literature (in development)

Sourcing and Distribution Channels.

Technology

Future Products.

Community Technology Center/e-Curriculum Delivery.

Market Analysis.

Market Segmentation.

Target Market

Industry Analysis.

Strategy Implementation Summary.

Strategy Pyramids.

Value Proposition.

Competitive Edge.

Marketing Strategy.

Sales Strategy.

Milestones

Management Summary.

Organizational Structure.

Management Team..

Management Team gaps.

Human Resources Plan.

Governing Body – Temporary Board.

Conflict Resolution Plan

Finance Plan.

Key Assumptions Used in Forecasting.

Key Financial Indicators.

Start-up Budget

Operating Budget – Year 1.

Operating Budget - Year 2.

Operating Budget - Year 3.

Source and Application of Funds (recommend further research)

Risk Analysis (recommend further research)

Balanced Scorecard for Educational Business Unit

Conclusion.

Now it is your turn…...

References.

Appendices.

RTC Start Up Budget

CTC Cash Flow Projection Year 1.

CTC Cash Flow Projection Year 2.

CTC Cash Flow Projection – Year 3.

CTC Cash Flow Projection- Year 4.

Expanded project- Genesis II Multiverse Communities.

Homepage.


Spectrum Academy

Business Plan

Executive Summary

 

Summary of Situational Analysis

 

Only 45% of Arizona youths detained by police last year were enrolled in school. (Juvenile Processed, 2002) “In 1990, minority youth were likely to have less favorable outcomes than Anglo youth that commit comparable offenses. In 2000, using reported data and a comprehensive qualitative process - where key stakeholders were interviewed and focus group sessions were held with individuals actively involved in the juvenile justice system - there is substantive agreement that minority youth are still over-represented when compared to their Anglo counterparts for comparable offenses.” (Commission, 2002)

 

Peer-community facilitators, as change agents, are rare in the development of alternative solutions to this growing problem: disenfranchised youth. Spectrum Academy is a potent answer to the current crisis facing our educational and juvenile systems today. It is a combination of a youth residential treatment center (RTC), charter school, and community technology center (CTC). This concept encompasses the value of education as emotional rips repair, because an emotionally unavailable youth cannot learn effectively. The community technology center promotes positive social interaction while facilitating the delivery of inexpensive e-curriculum to its patrons and to the vast array of charter schools that are struggling with the high costs of state-of-the-art education.

 

It seems our very survival, according to the analysis of socio-economic systems, depends on consumerism, cultural genocide, and environmental destruction for the sake of fossil fuels, fast foods, and corporate profits. This behavior affects our children immensely as they see no ‘common sense’ in our survival living styles. The old formulas simply do not work anymore; students are dull and listless in the classrooms, yet need healthy rites of passage. Emotionally and intellectually disenfranchised youth internalize their anger and act out in unprecedented violence toward self and others. Traditional education has not addressed the growing emotional and intellectual needs of our children; the connectedness of mind, body, and spirit. Currently, the situation regarding at-risk youth is cumbersome and oblique in regards to understanding the ‘big picture’ and the solutions necessary to empower our youth. A new myth is in process of creation and you can participate right now, today. Are you ready?

 

Opportunity Summary

 

Ted and Nancy Faust Sizer wrote in their book, The Students are Watching, “A student’s hope and sense of agency is often dependent on her sense that there is something that she can do which is valued by others”. Spectrum Academy’s unique program offers students structure to find success in new experiences and provide valuable work opportunities, reflecting increased personal value and self-esteem. Nurturing the individual is an important part of this plan. The disciplined structure provided some latitude and offered students the guidance to learn how to make positive choices in their lives.

 

Vision: Spectrum Academy, a proactive and progressive holistic educational environment, identifies and addresses the changing developmental and personal needs of challenged youths, empowering them to prepare for their journey toward successful community awareness and participation.

Holistic education is concerned with the growth of every person's intellectual, emotional, social, physical, artistic, creative and spiritual potentials. We are unique as a leader in the research, design, and implementation of holistic education using state-of-the-art technologies. Our collaborative alliances and partnerships with industry leaders bridge 21st Century learners with 21st Century technology and our emerging global culture.

 

Mission: Provide an alternative state-of-the-art holistic educational and living environment for youth 14 - 21 using peer-community development protocols, supportive of the community socio-economic structure, resulting in healthy and productive young adults who contribute to society.

 

We believe our first responsibility is to prepare the students to meet the challenges of the rapidly changing world around them. A holistic strategy in a peer-based community atmosphere facilitates students to perceive and understand the various contexts that shape and give meaning to life. Introducing students to a holistic view of the planet, life on Earth, the emerging world community, and the students’ interdependence demonstrates best practices of systems thinking. The environment and staff will nurture the development of emotional and multiple intelligences empowering each student’s personal growth. Engaging systems thinking requires student involvement in the research and design of their educational process, which creates ownership of learning. A collaborative approach toward problem solving develops critical interpersonal skills. Emerging technologies and their integration into our curriculum provide the students with real-time real-world experiences that prepare them for entering post-secondary life.

 

Imagine a fully integrated approach to inspiring and challenging our youth of today... aware of our problems and quickly focusing on creative solutions that empower balanced choice. Empowered adults now can empower our youth. The human race has entered a new era, an evolution in educational and social methodologies. Visionary perspectives lead to paradigm changes in society. Our world faces critical situations in developing our future society. Humanity is ripe for change. Primary areas of concern are commerce, education, administration of resources, and intense exploration into the depths of what keeps us afraid, angry, ignorant and immobile.


Key Recommendations 

Spectrum Academy is a potential answer to the current crisis. It is a combination of a youth residential treatment center (RTC), charter school, and community technology center (CTC). Experience and research have shown that these three areas can indeed work as one, which is what we intend to demonstrate through the creation of such an environment. We call this environment Spectrum Academy. The charter school is our first order of business.

 

A healthy life includes several areas of mastery, which most adults still have difficulty achieving in their daily living and working experience. Youth today have an even more demanding scenario as the world around them is changing rapidly. These basic areas of focus include Work; Intellect; Life Planning; Fulfillment; Recreation; Motivations; Health; and Relationships. Be The Dream, a 501 (c) (3) educational corporation, has determined that the synergy of the residential treatment center, charter school, and community technology center is what will determine a successful endeavor as the process develops through best practices of pedagogy and management philosophy.

 

Key Financial Start-up Assumptions

 

Charter School                                                                                               

            Start up -                                                                                              $300,000

            Annual Budget –                                                                                $1,200,000

 

Community Technology Center – e-Curriculum Data Center

            Data Center start up –                                                                          $430,000

 

Residential Treatment Center                                                                           

Start up                                                                                                  $71,000

            20-bed annual budget                                                                        $1,854,000

 

Land Purchase - Construction Costs                                                            $50,000,000

 

Forecasted Operational and Financial Results

 

*      150 students- charter school is financially operational beginning the third year.

*      Forecasts show the CTC/Data Center business unit reaches break-even in 6th month of the second year.

*      Forecasts for the residential treatment center are being compiled.

Invitation

 

Imagine a fully integrated approach to inspiring and challenging our youth of today... aware of our problems and quickly focusing on creative solutions. The human race has entered a new era, a revolution in educational methodologies. We are unveiling the embryo of an integrated master plan that could solve our educational and behavioral difficulties- unifying youth and adults while building individual and community respect.

We need solutions to bridge concepts and creators, chaotic experiences with order and structure. Chaos is only the beginning of the process of establishing natural order. Conflict, used wisely, evolves into harmony. Can we acknowledge that we have been going in the wrong direction? Better yet, can we accept that we have done the best we could with limited information and resources and now have better information and greater resources to affect positive change? Spectrum Academy offers solutions today that will change the patterns of problems of today by offering habilitating healthy habits for tomorrow. Please join us in this endeavor to empower our youth, now and for future generations.

Situational Analysis

In our world today, children suffer. Across Arizona and America, the suffering continues and the complexity of the issues rise exponentially as the global village expands. Educational systems, family environments and welfare agencies, no longer nurture the creative spark in our children; the love and care every child deserves and needs. Children who overcame the myriad of abusive scenarios are teaching others, both young and old, of the necessity to love and be loved. Many youth are caught in a frustrating correctional system that is challenged to reduce recidivism. Repairing emotional rips and tears in the family unit, if there is one, challenges yet another overburdened system. The survivors are doing a fantastic job in nurturing those they can, sharing volumes of experience, harvesting their past and showing the rest of us the path to a new approach, which shares accountability and responsibility. A nurturing environment that provides emotional and intellectual freedom to respond and grow personally and socially demonstrates a caregiver community’s love.

Anyone who works with at-risk youth understands that much more can be done toward addressing his or her needs. In the U.S. alone, many are warehoused in group homes with little or no opportunity to develop the necessary life skills to survive and thrive in today's world. Job markets are shifting faster than academic programs can keep up. Rather than create environments that nurture multiple and emotional intelligences, we drug our youth into submission and wonder why they choose to self-medicate and defy the 'system' that holds them captive. Adaptive systems and 'wrap-around' models in social services still only address the problems and symptoms of this decay in moral servitude. Peer-community facilitators, as change agents, are few and far between in the development of alternative solutions to this growing problem. Developing a model community that demonstrates integrated solutions seems to be in order.

 

Strategic Objectives

Innovative Community and Student Support

Spectrum Academy involves recurring themes throughout successful educational and youth programs, which are intensive family involvement; peer mentorship; intensive psychological treatment that includes all aspects of their lives; the use of animals as metaphor and therapy; a return to nature; stringent structure; individualized programs; and the instruction of new coping and living strategies. Habilitation of our youth is a priority at Spectrum Academy. Developing a peer-based community that reduces recidivism through effective education of conflict resolution applied to individual and group environments is one of our primary goals.

 

 


 

Strategic Goal #1- Internal
To provide a measurably effective and appropriate public college preparatory and holistic life skills education to a diverse group of students.

 

 

Key Components

Objectives

 

 

1. Student Achievement


Foster student achievement for diverse learners through the development and implementation of a program, which encourages individual strengths, expands each student's academic skills and content mastery and develops character.

*       Evaluate Spectrum Academy's curriculum in terms of our Mission and Charter; make any necessary recommendations for change

*       Create flexible curricula (or multiple pathways) for all students to reach their highest academic potential.

*       Improve test scores without compromising the educational mission of the school

*       Understand and address discrepancies in student achievement

*       Provide the services and support students with learning differences need to succeed

*       Develop a consistent, school-wide plan for demonstrating student achievement using multiple assessments including standardized tests.

*       Create a student achievement database and monitor student progress longitudinally

*       Attract and support the success of African American, Latino, English language learner and learning disabled students

 

 

2. Student Enrollment


Enroll and improve the performance of a wide range of students, including those who have been typically underrepresented in higher education.

*       Continually evaluate the enrollment process

*       Continue our efforts to attract "all kinds of minds"

*       Attract and support the needs of African American, Latino, English language learner and learning disabled students

*       Develop targeted outreach programs and increase awareness of Spectrum's mission among underrepresented populations

 

 

3. Faculty & Staff Development


Attract, retain, develop and support exceptional teachers and staff who are committed to the fulfillment of
Spectrum Academy's Mission

*       Create a schedule that gives high priority to faculty collaboration and planning time

*       Create a faculty/staff workload that is sustainable

*       Establish priorities and create ongoing, coordinated faculty professional development plan*

*       Maintain teacher: student ratios at 20 per classroom or lower per semester

*       Prepare a plan for faculty retention

*       Improve decision-making processes (in order to ensure effective use of faculty time)

*       Develop opportunities for and evaluate performance of faculty and staff

*       Develop faculty leadership opportunities

 

 

4. Parent Involvement


Involve parents in supporting their students' success and participating in the life of the School.

*       Increase parent involvement

*       Support the development of a parent community

*       Increase parents' understanding of and commitment to our Mission

*       Provide parent education opportunities that are responsive to the needs of the Spectrum

*       Academy parent community

*       Encourage parent usage of Spectrum Academy's resources

*       Encourage parent input

 

 

5. Internal Communication


Foster communication among students, parents, faculty, administration and Board in order to provide information and promote dialogue, involvement and support.

*       Provide regular multimodal communication with parents on school-wide news and events and student performance

*       Provide regular communication with and between students, parents, faculty, administration and Board members

*       Foster open communication and dialogue on issues of importance to the school and parents

*       Develop clear dispute resolution policy and procedures

 

 Strategic Goal #2-  External
To define and achieve long term organizational sustainability

Key Components

Objectives

6. Leadership Development


Develop and support strong leadership by the Advisory and Governing Board to ensure
Spectrum Academy’s ability to meet its Mission and attain long term viability

*       Define the roles of the Board, Committees, Principal and management

*       Determine the Board of Trustees composition and structure needed to implement the Strategic Plan

*       Attract, develop and evaluate an effective Board of Trustees

*       Develop a Succession Plan for the Board, Principal and Key Administrators

*       Develop a performance evaluation process for the Principal and the Board

*       Develop strategies to support and retain the Principal

*       Create a sustainable administrative structure 

7. Funding


Develop a long-range financial plan that assures the school's success and sustainability.

*       Align the budget process to support the attainment of the Mission and Strategic Plan

*       Ensure the fiscal soundness of the operating budget by ensuring the most efficient and optimal use of all resources

*       Develop funding strategies and programs which bridge the gap between Arizona's ADE allocation and the cost of delivering Spectrum Academy's college prep and life skills program to a diverse community of learners

*      Develop a Capital Campaign Plan to support the attainment and/or improvement of a long-term school site and peer-community village

*      Solicit private grants and scholarships

8. Charter Renewal


Develop a plan to renew
Spectrum Academy's Charter when due and prepare a contingency plan should the Charter not be renewed.

*       Review the charter and Mission Statement

*       Understand the charter renewal process and develop a plan for renewal

*       Develop a base of support with the Arizona Board of Education and Charter School Association

*       Develop plans to ensure the long term viability of Spectrum Academy

*       Ensure compliance with legal requirements

9. Partnerships


Define, develop and sustain partnerships with the Arizona Department of Education, academic institutions including colleges and universities, community leaders and funders to obtain support for
Spectrum Academy's Mission and Strategic Goals.

*       Develop and implement partnerships with each key group.

*       Develop partnerships with individuals and organizations who can support the school's long term viability

*       Develop partnerships with educators and educational organizations that share Spectrum Academy's Vision

*      Investigate opportunities for sharing resources with community partners

10. Facility


Secure a physical plant, which meets
Spectrum Academy's current and future program needs.

*       Provide classrooms and other facilities sufficient to allow Spectrum Academy to meet its Mission

*       Secure a facility that we have sufficient control over that we can raise funds for purchase and/or tenant improvements

*       Investigate alternative physical plant plans including, but not limited to:

o        Lease of a new site

o        Purchase of a new site

*       Continue to make building improvements needed to deliver Gateway's program and meet school building code requirements for charter schools

*       Ensure the safety of the students and faculty

11. External Communication


Foster communication with funders and community to provide information and promote dialogue, involvement and support.

*       Improve awareness of, and support for, Spectrum Academy in Gilbert and statewide.

*       Develop and implement a plan for communicating with and motivating all interested constituents.

*       Share best practices with the educational community

       

Keys to Success

Function

The function of holistic education within the community exemplifies the systems approach in business, education, and community. The cohesive and comprehensive approach integrates the current and future needs of our developing local and global communities. It is the total immersion of the student in their environment, utilizing best practices of educational processes, and connecting real-world exploration that prepares students with critical thinking, problem-solving, and entrepreneurial skills to meet life’s callings. Ultimately we all seek some joy of living; enjoyment of life. Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi’s research identifies some interesting details that not only acknowledge the obvious; they reveal potential structure for creating environments that illicit personal and professional growth, which is so necessary for the future of students and their success in life.

“As our studies have suggested, the phenomenology of enjoyment has eight major components. When people reflect on how it feels when their experience is most positive, they mention at least one, and often all of the following. First, the experience usually occurs when we confront tasks we have a chance of completing. Second, we must be able to concentrate on what we are doing. Third and fourth, the concentration is usually possible because the task undertaken has clear goals and provides immediate feedback. Fifth, one acts with a deep but effortless involvement that removes from awareness the worries and frustrations of everyday life. Sixth, enjoyable experiences allow people to exercise a sense of control over their actions. Seventh, concern for the self disappears, yet paradoxically the sense of self emerges stronger after the flow experience is over. Finally, the sense of the duration of time is altered; hours pass by in minutes, and minutes can stretch out to seem like hours. The combination of all these elements causes a sense of deep enjoyment that is so rewarding people feel that expending a great deal of energy is worthwhile simply to be able to feel it.” (Flow, 1990)

 

Given these factors and the capacity to meet them in an educational environment, we feel that not only will the students have the opportunity to experience success academically; the community, of which the school is a part, will experience success in real-world models as they develop their future vision, engage their peers, and extend their influence into society. The inclusion of a percentage of disenfranchised youth in the school population effectively cleans the fish tank instead of just wiping off the fish. The results are empowered youth who can make positive choices and provide leadership for their peers.

Holistic education means that the organization itself has to be aware and functional within the realms of mind, body, and spirit. On a pragmatic level, this means that we consider the ‘total system’ of a human being in process of development. Gardner found that there are multiple intelligences at work in the learning system of a student. Goleman brought emotional intelligences to our awareness. Others, like Steiner and Montessori, have attempted to address these intelligences in their own ways, whether acknowledging them outright or just by knowing there is a ‘better’ way to prepare youth for the journey of life. Csikszentmihalyi, Covey, Drucker, DeBono, Peters, and Senge are all pointing toward personal and organizational transformation through understanding the connectedness of people and process. Systems-thinking is a core competency of that kind of organization. The ‘systems’ approach here is to identify and nurture the natural skill sets of the individual in order for them to find their natural order and place within the collective, evidencing and exampling a holistic lifestyle that affects positive change.

Traditional structure found in both business and education is hedging the idea of initiative and innovation through understanding the need for collaborative alliances – cooperation instead of competition. Edward DeBono clearly addresses this concept below:

“At any moment our thinking is shaped by a number of factors. Sometimes we are aware of these factors and sometimes they are so much in the background that they exert their powerful influence in a hidden way. We can challenge these shaping factors just as we challenge existing methods, concepts, or ideas. But in this case we are not challenging something that already exists. We are challenging the factors and pressures that lead us to think in a certain way.” (Serious Creativity, 1992)  

 

Leading innovative peer-community student programs and services:

*       Problem-solving and reasoning skills: Children who think that there are only two ways to solve problems--fight or give-up--are more likely to become either perpetrators or victims of violence. Children's ability to reason well can give them a wider variety of options than just fighting or running. Children who are more proficient at generating and evaluating options in academic and social settings are less likely to choose violent ways of solving conflicts and promote the same behavior tendencies in others.

*       Social capacities: These skills, attitudes, and dispositions include development of empathy, effective communication, humor, and attachment to positive, non-violent individuals or groups. Understanding another person's point of view and having concern for other persons can help students generate a wider variety of options--some of which may be mutually acceptable. Students must be able both to listen with understanding and to be understood. The ability to laugh and create moments where others, too, feel more light-hearted can often become one of the most successful options to reducing violent responses. Humor can also enable someone not to immediately take things too personally. The ability to be a friend and have friends can create a stronger desire to find non-violent ways of solving conflicts.

*       A productive sense of purpose, independence, and power: Children who are more likely to turn to violence have no hope in the future. Conversely, children who believe they can control their lives and want to direct their lives in positive and productive ways are more likely to seek non-violent means to resolve conflict.

            Peer mediation programs:

*       Teaches students to view conflict as a natural part of life

*       Teaches students to solve their own problems

*       Improves communication, critical thinking and negotiation skills

*       Reduces the time teachers and administrators spend on discipline

*       Reduces the number of detentions and suspensions

*       Promotes intercultural understanding

*       Fosters a climate within the school that is conducive to learning

 

Initial assessments of students/clients in:

*      Aptitude and Ability                 

*      Multiple Intelligences

*      Emotional Intelligences

*      Learning Styles

*      Holistic Understanding

*      Special Needs

*      Systems Thinking Awareness

 

Company Background

Company Ownership

Spectrum Academy is an educational branch of Be The Dream, a non-profit 501 (c) (3) registered educational and philanthropic corporation in the State of Arizona. The Co-Directors of Be The Dream reside in the Town of Gilbert. Spectrum Academy will include the staff and teachers as owners and stakeholders within the first year of operation. Collective ownership is yet another facet of the holistic system approach.

 

Start-up Plan (US Charter Schools Model)

 

First Level WBS Network Diagram


           
Second and Third Level WBS Network Diagrams

 

 

Deliverables

                                                                         Project Mgr.    Ed. Mgr.          Bus. Mgr.        Com. Mgr.          Asst.       Status

Deliverables                                                                                                                                        

                                                                                                                                                   

Core Group/Experts                                     R                      C                      C/S                  C                         C             I

                                                                                                                                                     

Comprehensive Plan                                  C/S                  R                      C                      C                         C             I

                                                                                                                                                     

Charter Draft                                                  R                      C/S                  C                      C                         C             I

                                                                                                                                                     

Charter Application                                      R                      C/S                  C                      C                         C             I

                                                                                                                                                     

Letters of Support                                         R                      C                      C                      C/S                      I               I

                                                                                                                                                     

Operations Plan                                           C/S                  C                      R                      C                         C             I

                                                                                                                                                     

Operating Agreements                                C/S                  C                      R                      C                         I               D

                                                                                                                                                     

Formal Organization                                    R                      C                      C                      C                         I               I

                                                                                                                                                     

Enrolled Students                                        I                        R                      C                      C                         C             NS

                                                                                                                                                     

School Staff                                                   C/S                  R                      C                      C                         C             I

                                                                                                                                                     

Instructional Program                                  C/S                  R                      C                      C                         C             I

                                                                                                                                                     

Support Services                                          S                      I                        R                      I                           I               D

                                                                                                                                                                 

Building/Site                                                  S                      C                      C                      R                         I               D

                                                                                                                                                     

Student Performance Data                         S                      R                      I                        I                           C             NS

                                                                                                                                                   

Stakeholder legend: I-Informed   S-Signs-off   C-contributor  R-responsible

One Responsible and one Sign-off per deliverable

Legend: NS-Not Started  C-Completed   I-In progress   D-Deferred   O-Overdue

 

Locations and Facilities

Initial development of Spectrum Academy will be in the Gilbert/Chandler, Arizona area. A specific location has not been determined, although options are being considered. The ideal location would have some existing structures for initial classrooms and administrative activity with suitable acreage (150-200) for development and expansion.

 

Key Products and Services

 

Description

Qualities and Dimensions of Effective Youth Education

Effective youth education responds to the real lives, needs and interests of youth.

*      Youth feel like they matter.

*      Holistic education is innovative and dynamic.

*      There is not one model – in this environment there is a relational pattern of knowing youth; innovating and changing in order to be responsive.

Hospitality and relationship building are foundational to effective youth education.

*      Young people are welcomed and accepted.

*      Extending personal invitations, providing warm groups is intentional and ongoing.

*      Web of relationships: youth with youth, youth with adults, business community with youth, youth in their families.

Effective youth education has a variety of ways for youth to be involved.

*      Boundaries between programs are permeable.

*      Holistic education is multifaceted.

*      There are variety of levels of participation among youth and their families.

In effective education, youth are active in making positive changes happen (youth are not passive receivers of learning.)

*      Youth have ownership of their education efforts.

*      Youth share leadership in programs and visioning.

*      Youth relate and share their success with their peers.

*      Leading programs help youth grow in their own empowerment and self-esteem.


SPECIFIC PROGRAMS / COMPONENTS

Holistic Education Formation
Education with adolescents most often begins with real life issues and connects learning to life. Learning formation is at the heart of youth education. To be effective and engaging with youth, learning formation has these qualities:

*      Facilitated by open-minded, authentic, passion-filled adults

*      Engages youths’ energies toward inclusion rather than exclusion

*      Includes community building, peer and social

*      Includes peer sharing, empowerment and leadership

*      Includes animal care and gardening/landscaping

*      Teaches about personal identity and relation to the world

*      Seizes teachable moments as the most precious commodity

*      Is experiential, active and innovative in the rapid-change environments

*      Doesn’t feel like school – doesn’t lecture or have too much focus on textbooks.

Community Service
The experience of service helps youth grow in compassion and understanding. An effective method of engaging youth in community service is educational reflection – connecting acts of service to learning, peer-community social teachings and everyday life. These experiences:

*      Change their perspective

*      Broaden their awareness

*      Create empathy

*      Help youth feel valuable

*      Make life real – hands on and heart-centered

*      Form community

Leadership
Youth have a different way of expressing understanding within daily living – it is more sensual. Youth’s expression of connecting school-to-living in daily life needs incorporation into the celebration of success. Music and wholesome activities are important for youth to engage in their experience. The involvement of youth in community service brings tremendous value to the community – providing energy, skill and powerful presence. For the young people it builds confidence, self-esteem, and helps them develop life goals.

Extended Trips
Trips, camps, conferences and regional events are important because they:

*      Help youth feel pride and enthusiasm in their transformation

*      Build community among youth

*      Build community between youth and adults

*      Create opportunities for leadership

*      Amaze young people by connecting them with large numbers of other youths in the community.

Retreats
Youth retreats have a unique ability to touch the hearts of young people, build communities of service, help youth to grow closer to their own inner fortitude and draw youth back into active involvement in life. Retreats change the lives of young people. Studies have shown:

*      Youth mentioned the life changing impact.

*      Adult leaders frequently mentioned some aspect of peer community/leadership.

*      Staff recognize profound positive changes in youth. 

Educational Assessments

Linking assessment to instruction - embedding it in the process of learning - is critical to full implementation of new science standards. To allow students to construct learning in the classroom through authentic experiences, assessment must be:

*      Open-ended, allowing for discussion and revision of new understanding.

*      Tolerant of divergent thinking and promote the notion of no "one right answer."

*      Presented in alternative modes, not just written responses to limiting questions.

*      Designed to foster analysis, comparison, generalization, prediction, and modification.

*      Capable of promoting collaboration and team effort in demonstration of competence.

*      Ongoing and cumulative, showing growth over time. (NCREL, 2003)

Design of the Assessment Process

*      Student, faculty, and administrative goals and objectives to improve student academic achievement

*      Statements about how much responsibility the faculty have for the design and implementation of the assessment plan

*      Role of faculty development and training in assessment

*      How to utilize faculty expertise in the assessment process

*      Program reviews for academic departments

*      How the school can use students, faculty, and administrators in its multiple measures

*      Role of administrators in the areas of budgeting, resource allocation, and time management for the assessment plan

 

Competitive Comparison

 

“A spiritualized education would seek to open the mind, warm the heart and awaken the spirit of each student. It would provide opportunities for students to be creative, contemplative, and imaginative. It would allow time to tell old and new stories of heroes, ideals and transformation. It would encourage students to go deep, into themselves, into nature, and into human affairs. It would value service to others and the planet.” (Spirituality, April 14, 2003)

 

Research has determined that there are few, if any, that apply the complete concept of Spectrum Academy. Several residential programs include elements of holistic education, peer-mediation/community, and/or community technology centers. Spectrum Academy is a Vision of Value for empowering disenfranchised youth caught in the throws of insolence and maturation. A full comparison on Spectrum Academy’s competition would take substantially more research and recommended as part of further development.

 

Sales Literature (in development)

Marketing is through presentations and web-based activity with few exceptions. Promotional materials are not complete at this time. Points addressed in marketing campaign include:

*       Active student, parent, community and teacher participation in debate and decision-making are essential to strengthening public education. 

*       Society reinforces public education's importance in a democracy by publicly governing schools, in addition to publicly financing them. Rather than diminishing parents' responsibility for their children, this underlines the collective responsibility for everyone's children. 

*       Improving the quality of, and access to, education must drive the agenda for educational reform, rather than fiscal restraint or ideological conviction. 

*       The public education system currently makes available, and is committed to continuing to offer, a variety of program options to meet the diverse needs of all students. 

*       A publicly funded, democratically governed system of education with a mandate to provide quality education for all children should not be undermined by charter schools. 

*       True choice in education must enhance educational equity, making pedagogically-sound choices equally available to all. 

Sourcing and Distribution Channels

    Technology

21st Century learners need 21st Century technology at their fingertips, including:

*       State-of-the-art computers and LAN

*       Updateable e-curriculum supplemented learning

*       Multiple intelligence learning centers

*       Emotional intelligence development

*       Multi-media studio – computer-based

*       Ergonomic classrooms w/special needs inclusion

*       Core subject state-of-the-art lab materials

*       State-of-the-art machinery for vocational programs

Supply Chain Management

The supply chain management philosophy applied to the school environment would call for the integration of customer and company, student and school, parent/partner and community. Practical applications of research bring the cross-functional teams together to share information, materials, and resources that empower the school’s compliance with its mission. The vision of the founders includes the incorporation of supply chain management applied to creating collaborative alliances, which also includes the research and development of resources. The Advisory Council and Board of Directors are utilized for contacts and resources to help establish relationships that can benefit from research provided by the school through its students and staff.

 


 

Future Products

Community Technology Center/e-Curriculum Delivery

“Long distance learning has taken on a important role in developing countries like Brazil, where the vast territory and large population requires the use of powerful tools capable of offering quality education courses, from entry level post-secondary studies to masters and doctor degrees. The rising demand for such education courses has provoked the need for developing collaborative alliances between academic institutions and clients.” (Azevedo, et al, 1999)

The delivery of curriculum through electronic means is a growing trend in America. Developing a Community Technology Center (CTC), with data center capacity, to compile and deliver e-curriculum serves not only the community of residence; it also allows businesses, home-schoolers, and public and private schools across the nation low cost access to state-of-the-art curriculum. This feature can fund the RTC in three years. This also fits with the 21st Century Technology Educational Centers program currently offered by the U.S. Department of Education.

Future Development

Contracted curriculum packages (bundled or stand-alone) will offer educational programs at greatly reduced costs, increasing access to low-income areas. This increases opportunity for teacher-developed curricula and making it available to large numbers and remunerate the creators in the process. Community Technology Centers, developed as partnerships with schools, provide additional capacity for adult education programs for acquiring a GED or college credits toward degree programs. Community-based educational programs empower community leaders and members to effectively develop and manage community affairs. Access to social services electronic programs increases quality of life for low-income community members.

CTC Opportunities

Charter schools that choose to work together, sharing site licenses, can reduce curriculum expenses while increasing teacher effectiveness, which means more time with the students and easier lesson planning.  Web hosting services, along with e-mail, provide schools greater exposure with less cost. Internet content filters installed on-site keeps clean content delivery for students and teachers. Non-Profit Organizations benefit through reduced costs, greater accessibility of Internet or Web-related services, while building capacity in the development of the network of organizations and service to the community. Service Organizations can offer assistance, information, and programs while establishing growth in their community network. Discussions, forums, web-based workshops are made available with ease of data management. (see Appendix – Community Technology Center Cash Flow Projection)

Youth Residential Treatment Facility (RTC)

At-risk students are often wards of the court or in behavioral/correctional programs. Additional funding sources are available through RTC development and utilized in the overall educational programs offered by Spectrum Academy. A peer-based community wrap-around model, including support systems of family, friends, teachers, therapists, probation officers, etc. is currently a goal established with the partnership of the Arizona Juvenile Corrections Department and Value Options service provider. Recidivism decreases dramatically through peer-based programs that empower leadership development. (see Appendix – RTC Start-up Costs)

Market Analysis

Market Segmentation

The Town of Gilbert, Arizona is the initial site development location. Gilbert is the eighth largest city in Arizona with a 10-year 265% increase in population. The Per Capita income was $24,792 in 2000 with a near 80% Caucasian population. Service area will include Maricopa County as program expands.

Population Stats as of 2000

 

Town of Gilbert Comparison

Gilbert

Phoenix

Tucson

Flagstaff

Pop. 1990 (Rev.)
Pop. 2000

Change
Change

State Ranking

Growth Ranking

National Ranking

30,003
109,697

79,694
265.62

8

19

205

988,983
1,321,045

332,062
33.58

1

410

6

417,139
486,699

69,560
16.68

2

828

30

45,857
52,894

7,037
15.35

11

890

569

 

Income Stats as of 2000

 

Town of Gilbert Comparison

Gilbert

Phoenix

Tucson

Flagstaff

 

Count

%

Count

%

Count

%

Count

%

Households 2000
Under 20,000
20,000-30,000
30,000-40,000
40,000-50,000
50,000-75,000
75,000-100,000
100,000-125,000
125,000-150,000
150,000-200,000
Over 200,000

Avg HH Income
Median HH Income
Per Capita Income

35,512
2,003
2,252
2,776
3,652
9,693
7,484
4,053
1,552
1,190
857

$76,554
$68,032
$24,795


5.64
6.34
7.82
10.28
27.29
21.07
11.41
4.37
3.35
2.41



 

466,114
95,958
65,797
63,368
51,551
89,831
45,918
22,526
10,935
9,674
10,556

$55,408
$41,207
$19,833


20.59
14.12
13.59
11.06
19.27
9.85
4.83
2.35
2.08
2.26



 

192,884
58,949
33,894
28,508
20,476
29,487
11,946
4,714
1,817
1,713
1,380

$40,133
$30,981
$16,322


30.56
17.57
14.78
10.62
15.29
6.19
2.44
.94
.89
.72



 

19,355
4,796
2,944
2,543
2,000
3,360
1,793
941
338
343
297

$50,076
$37,146
$18,637


24.78
15.21
13.14
10.33
17.36
9.26
4.86
1.75
1.77
1.53


 

 

Ethnicity Stats as of 2000

 

Town of Gilbert Comparison

Other Metropolitan Areas

 

Gilbert

Phoenix

Tucson

Flagstaff

 

Count

%

Count

%

Count

%

Count

%

Pop. 2000
White
Black
Asian
Hispanic
Other

109,697
87,597
2,515
3,863
13,026
2,696


79.85
2.29
3.52
11.87
2.46

1,321,045
736,844
63,756
25,453
449,972
45,020


55.78
4.83
1.93
34.06
3.41

486,699
263,748
19,795
11,537
173,868
17,751


54.19
4.07
2.37
35.72
3.65

52,894
36,760
866
651
8,500
6,117


69.50
1.64
1.23
16.07
11.56

Sources: US Census Bureau and Synergos Technologies, Inc.

Target Market

Market Needs

*      Holistic education

*      Special needs programs

*      College prep

*      Life skills

*      Technology-driven

*      Peer-community

*      ESL inclusion

*      Homeschooling

 

Educational Trends

There are 116,910 public and private schools with K-12 students in the United States alone, of which 89,508 are public. Virtually every public school is now connected to the Internet. In the US alone, there are over 52 million K-12 school students and 4.2 million K-12 teachers. USD 351 billion was expended on K-12 education in 1999 with an additional USD 232 billion spent on post secondary education, not including vocational, specialty and professional development training. (Source: National Center for Education Statistics) It is estimated that schools write 25 million purchase orders in a year at a cost of between USD 100 and USD 150 above the actual cost of the product for each requisition. (Source: Lamar Alexander, CEO of Simplexis.com, February 1, 2000).

Ten Educational Trends Shaping School Planning and Design

*      The Lines of Prescribed Attendance Areas Will Blur

*      Schools Will Be Smaller and More Neighborhood Oriented

*      There Will Be Fewer Students Per Class

*      Technology Will Dominate Instructional Delivery

*      The Typical Spaces Thought to Constitute a School May Change

*      Students and Teachers Will Be Organized Differently

*      Students Will Spend More Time in School

*      Instructional Materials Will Evolve

*      Grade Configurations Will Change

*      Schools Will Disappear Before the End of the 21st Century (Or Will They?)

(Kenneth, 2002)

According to the National Home Education Research Institute, there were and estimated 1,700,000 to 2,100,000 children (grades K-12) home educated during 2002-2003 in the United States. In 2000-2001 the number was about 1.5 million to 1.9 million, demonstrating a continued growth in home educated youths. Now the concept of holistic education is reaching the halls of academia.

 

Holistic Education...

*      is concerned with the growth of every person's intellectual, emotional, social, physical, artistic, creative and spiritual potentials. It actively engages students in the teaching/learning process and encourages personal and collective responsibility.

*      is a quest for understanding and meaning. Its aim is to nurture healthy, whole, curious persons who can learn whatever they need to know in any new context. By introducing students to a holistic view of the planet, life on Earth, and the emerging world community, holistic strategies enable students to perceive and understand the various contexts, which shape and give meaning to life.

*      recognizes the innate potential of EVERY student for intelligent, creative, systemic thinking. This includes so-called "students-at-risk", most of whom have severe difficulties learning within a mechanistic reductionistic paradigm, which emphasizes linear, sequential processes.

*      recognizes that all knowledge is created within a cultural context and that the "facts" are seldom more than shared points of view. It encourages the transfer of learning across separate academic disciplines. Holistic education encourages learners to critically approach the cultural, moral and political contexts of their lives.

*      values spiritual literacy (in a non-sectarian sense). Spirituality is a state of connectedness to all life, honoring diversity in unity. It is an experience of being, belonging and caring. It is sensitivity and compassion, joy and hope. It is the harmony between the inner life and the outer life. It is the sense of wonder and reverence for the mysteries of the universe and a feeling of the purposefulness of life. It is moving towards the highest aspirations of the human spirit.                                                                          

(Holistic Education Network, Tasmania, Australia)

 

Market Growth

Table 1 shows the number of charter schools in 1999-2000. Table 2 shows the number of charter schools in 2002-2003. Arizona alone went from 207 in 1999-2000 to 464 in 2002-2003, a 124% increase over two academic years. Table 3 shows the number of youth involved in the Maricopa County Juvenile Corrections from 1997 through 2002. Table 4 shows increase in new and recommitment of youths in the Arizona Juvenile Corrections System.

 

 

Table 1

 

 

Selected States Charter Schools for 2002-2003

 

State

New Schools for 2002-2003

Total Schools for 2002-2003

Approved to Open 2003-2004

Alaska

1

15

0

Arizona

49

464

11

California

89

428

7

Colorado

6

93

0

Connecticut

0

16

0

Florida

38

227

4

Georgia

8

35

3

Idaho

5

13

1

Illinois

3

29

0

Kansas

2

30

0

Louisiana

2

20

0

Massachusetts

6

46

6

Michigan

3

196

12

Minnesota

18

87

0

Missouri

5

26

2

Nevada

4

13

0

New Jersey

2

56

0

New Mexico

7

28

4

New York

7

38

10

North Carolina

5

93

2

Ohio

31

131

0

Oregon

6

25

1

Pennsylvania

15

91

2

Rhode Island

3

8

0

South Carolina

7

13

0

Texas

25

221

0

Wisconsin

22

130

0

US Total

393

2695

69

Table 2                                                            (US Charter Schools)

Table 3                                                            (AZ Supreme Court)

 

Table 4                                                            (AZ Supreme Court)

 

 

In the last 15 years, the number of juvenile offenders under the age of 15 increased 94%. For the same period, here are specific trends given FBI category counts:

·         Simple Assault --- up 98%

·         Aggravated Assault --- up 64%

·         Carrying a Weapon --- up 50%

·         Murder --- up 39%

·         Robbery --- up 37%

·         Auto Theft --- up 17%

·         Arson --- up 17%

·         Vandalism --- up 15%

·         Larceny-Theft --- up 11%

·         Burglary --- down 17%

·         Rape --- down 20%

(O’Connor, Tom, Ph.D., 2003)

 

Industry Analysis

General Statistics for Arizona

Schools Allowed-                                                 Unlimited

Charters Operating (2001)                                419

Approval Process

Eligible Chartering Authorities                         Local school boards, state board of education, state board for charter schools

Eligible Applicants                                              Public body, private person, private organization

Types of Charter Schools                                  Converted public, converted private, new starts

Appeals Process                                                 None

Local Support Required                                     No

Recipient of Charter                                            Charter school governing body

Term of Initial Charter                                        15 years

Operations

Automatic Waiver from Most State and District Education Laws, Regulations, and Policies                                Yes

Legal Autonomy                                                  Yes

Governance                                                          Governing board

Governing Body Subject to Open Meeting Laws                           Yes

Managed or Operated by a For-Profit Organization                     Yes

Transportation for Students                               Authorized by local school boards, transportation may be provided by the district; other charter schools receive state transportation aid to provide transportation for students

Facilities Assistance                                           Department of Education must publish list of vacant state buildings suitable for charter schools. Non-profit charter schools may apply for financing from Industrial Development Authorities.

Technical Assistance                                          Provided by Department of Education /non-governmental entities

Reporting Requirements                                   Annual report card for parents and A.D.E.; also an annual audit.

 

Funding

Amount                                                                  Authorized by local school boards, funding may be negotiated and is specified in the charter; for other charter schools, funding is determined by the same base support level formula used for all district schools. Estimated portion is about $4,600.

Path                                                                        Funds pass through district to charter schools authorized by local school boards; from state to all other charters schools.

Fiscal Autonomy                                                  Yes

Start-up Funds                                                     Federal and state funds available

Teachers

District Work Rules                                             Covered by district bargaining agreement, negotiate as separate unit with charter school governing body, or work independently

Certification                                                          Not required

Leave of Absence                                               Up to 3 years

Retirement Benefits                                            Charter schools must participate in state’s retirement system

Students              

Eligible Students                                                 All students in state

Preference                                                            District residents if sponsored by local school board; siblings.

Enrollment Requirements                                 Not permitted

Selection Method (over-enrollment)                Equitable selection process such as a lottery

At-Risk Provisions                                               None

Accountability                                                      Students must take AIMS test; nationally standardized norm-referenced achievement test as designated by the state board, and distribute an annual report card

Other Features

Location of Charter School                                School districts cannot sponsor charter schools located outside the geographic boundaries of the district

-- October 2001
The Center for Education Reform

 

Industry Participants

A survey of several senior executives from two of the areas of concern would provide benchmarks for building. Administrators from charter schools and youth residential treatment centers were helpful in defining focal areas. Order of the answers is not significant to the priority of concern.

 

Who are your customers?

            Youth 14-21

            Families

            Support people (friends, teachers, etc.)

            Referral sources

            Agency professionals (Probation Officers, case managers, etc.)

What do you think constitutes excellence in customer service?

            Customer involvement

            Attention to detail

            Careful listening

            Follow up

            Total quality management

How could you best serve your customers without any bottlenecks or restrictions?

            High staff to client/student ratio

            State-of-the-art-training

            Profit sharing (as identifier of better customer service)

            Personalizing services

            Technology availability

            Community exposure

How do you communicate your Vision and Mission?

            Formal meetings and training

            Demonstrated by management

            Customer interactions

            Community involvement

            Advertising and publications (print, web, manuals)

What are the major concerns in running your organization?

            Maintaining employees

            Staying tuned to Vision and Mission

            Becoming best in industry

            Value-added services for customers

            Making the money last

            Return on assets

Do you follow the ‘Management By Walking Around’ technique and if not, what management techniques do you use?

            Resounding ‘Yes’ and…

            Micromanagement (ability to deal with customer one-to-one)

What organizational models do you follow?

            Organic/horizontal

            Hierarchy

How does your organization create collaborative alliances in the community?

            Professional meetings, trainings, Special events

            Networking with contacts

            Professional partnership development

            Contracts for services

How do you feel a change in the economy affects your organization?

            Fewer dollars available from funding sources

            Budget cuts – retards programs

            Greater utilization of limited resources

What have you found to be the best methods of communication in your organization?

            Face-to-face

            Personalized communication (e-mail, memos, letters)

            Longer timelines for exchanges

            Open door / open books

            Recognition of individual contributions/group achievements

What accounting standards does your organization follow?

            General accounting procedures

            Special reports as needed for funding sources & State agencies

Do you focus on profit per location or profit per customer?

            Profit? (residential treatment centers)

            Profit per location

What are some of the primary fiscal obstacles you face?

            Shortage of grants

            Federal funding

            Corporate sponsorships

            Tax dollars

            Reduction in staff

            Budget cuts

What is the corporate culture like in your organization?

            Well-educated

            Cyber savvy

            Family oriented

            Mostly casual

            Inclusion at all levels

What innovations has your organization implemented in your industry?

            Peer-based community program

            Partnership with referral sources

            Holistic educational approach

How do you feel today’s youth are developing toward employability?

            Need better socialization skills

                        Conflict resolution/mediation

            Need more flexibility in dealing with change

            Need better problem-solving skills

What are you most concerned about in running an organization today?

            Developing a cohesive team

                        Creative, dynamic and flexible as change agents

Distribution Patterns

Since the 1999-2000 academic year there has been a 224% increase in the number of charter schools in Arizona alone. Mostly at-risk students that were not able to perform in regular district schools populate these schools, which is not what was intended by the AZ Department of Education. This population has a high incidence of problems within the community, from criminal offenses to dysfunctional social skills. Recidivism is high without special programs designed to address behavioral and psychological needs in educational settings. A demonstrable model with proven success in the community and statistically is easily duplicable in any area of urban or rural need.

Competitive Factors

*       Active student, parent, community and teacher participation in debate and decision-making are essential to strengthening public education. 

*       Society reinforces public education's importance in a democracy by publicly governing schools, in addition to publicly financing them. Rather than diminishing parents' responsibility for their children, this underlines the collective responsibility for everyone's children. 

*       Improving the quality of, and access to, education must drive the agenda for educational reform, rather than fiscal restraint or ideological conviction. 

*       The public education system currently makes available, and is committed to continuing to offer, a variety of program options to meet the diverse needs of all students. 

*       A publicly funded, democratically governed system of education with a mandate to provide quality education for all children should not be undermined by charter schools. 

*       True choice in education must enhance educational equity, making pedagogically-sound choices equally available to all. 

Key Competitors

*      Charter schools and residential treatment centers offering similar programs.

*      E-curriculum development and delivery companies currently using the Internet.

*      Community technology centers providing educational programs.

*      Existing juvenile corrections programs.

 

Strategy Implementation Summary

 

Strategy Pyramids

Make our name known. We are unique as a leader in the research, design, and implementation of holistic education using state-of-the-art technologies. Our collaborative alliances and partnerships with industry leaders bridge 21st Century learners with 21st Century technology and our emerging global culture.

Nurture the development of emotional and multiple intelligences empowering each student’s personal growth. Engaging systems thinking requires student and parental involvement in the research and design of the student’s educational process, which creates ownership of learning.

Use destination thinking to develop collaborative alliances. Partnerships increase exposure and resources. Transformational leaders are the brokers of dreams, shaping a strategic vision of a realistic and attractive future that bonds employees together and focuses their energy toward a superordinate organizational goal.

Incorporating emerging technologies and their integration into our curriculum provide the students with real-time, real-world experiences that prepare them for entering post-secondary life.

 

Value Proposition

Demonstrating a systems approach to living through the educational environment is crucial to the evolution of society as a whole if we expect to survive, let alone advance as a global village. Respectfully, a local environment is no less a global village. Peter Senge uses an excellent illustration of the process of maturation into ‘seeing’ our current reality before we can change it:

 

“Significantly, Scrooge can’t make the choice to change before he becomes more aware of his current reality. In effect, Dickens says that life always avails the option of seeing the truth, no matter how blind and prejudiced we may be. And if we have the courage to respond to that option, we have the power to change ourselves profoundly. Or, to put it in more classic religious terms, only through the truth do we come to grace.” (Fifth Discipline, 1990)

 

Competitive Edge

Spectrum Academy, built on the foundation of best practices in management philosophy, incorporates customer involvement, supply chain management, and labor relations. Adhering to the goals of the balanced scorecard approach, the school will engage cross-functional teams at every level in its operations. The discoveries of these teams and the analysis of their findings will set the prioritization for elements within each division and department. Systems-thinking requires that all elements have importance and relevance in the mix. The primary factors however, will be meeting State and Federal Standards for education with fiduciary responsibility being equally important.

 

Dedication to the holistic education philosophy affects staff and students, nurturing collaborative alliances that example the kinds of relationships necessary for success in post-secondary life, as well as engaging the student in their education and development of critical thinking skills that reveal the innate patterns and processes in the emergence of systems thinking. Spectrum Academy’s creation of interdependent business and community relationships demonstrate the value of the vision and mission of the school.

           

In today’s ever-changing environment, Spectrum Academy will have the administrational and operational foundations to manage that change with skill and precision. Combining, even synergizing, the traditional framework of business, school, and community so that it is addressed as a whole system only makes sense in the growing demands of operating in the world in an integrated fashion. The infrastructure of progressive institutions allows and even encourages new discoveries and their incorporation into the institutional mix. The Academy seeks to apply cutting-edge integrative technologies, both scientific and psychospiritual, across the spectrum to meet the emerging demands of the 21st Century student and community.

 

“At any moment our thinking is shaped by a number of factors. Sometimes we are aware of these factors and sometimes they are so much in the background that they exert their powerful influence in a hidden way. We can challenge these shaping factors just as we challenge existing methods, concepts, or ideas. But in this case we are not challenging something that already exists. We are challenging the factors and pressures that lead us to think in a certain way.” (Serious Creativity, 1992)

 

 

Marketing Strategy

Positioning Statement

Educational reformation is unavoidable and happening slowly through a variety of methods. Much of this process is happening through underdeveloped or underutilized programs and click and mortar structures caught in paradigm paralysis. This paradigm paralysis occurs because there are no new models, no working examples, of what is truly necessary to develop strong youth and adult learning programs ultimately building a strong community. It is apparent by our ‘walled communities’ that we have forgotten the essence of what makes us strong as a nation. Sustainable growth comes from community involvement that is facilitated through the inclusion practices of the organization; developing a community capable of raising the new genre of children through a systems approach to learning. Our innovative peer-community and curriculum development and the community responsive students that graduate will know Spectrum Academy as a leader in educational reform.

 

Pricing Strategy

*      Utilize multiple programs for higher ratios of dollars per student.

*      Collaboration with AZ Charter School Association for e-curriculum delivery.

*      Bundled curriculum site licensing for distribution and reduced costs for consumers.

*      Partnerships with Service Providers, AZ Juvenile Corrections, Courts, and Universities.

*      Access government, federal and state, funding to support low-cost delivery of services.

*      Provide services unavailable anywhere else.

Promotion Strategy

*      Homeschooling networks

*      Juvenile Corrections Department

*      Social Service and Health Care providers

*      Webvertising – E-mail with auto responders

*      Holistic and Alternative Health practitioners

*      Public relations events with radio and television coverage

Marketing Programs

*      Webvertising using targeted e-mail and auto responders

*      Search engine marketing – keyword purchase and sponsor links

*      Traditional sales – expos, conventions, civic groups

*      Newspaper and radio advertising

*      Educator conventions

*      Related media publications

*      Public relations campaign

 

Sales Strategy

“The survival of our ego is at stake. Our vision begins to be stated in things we don’t want- ‘I don’t want to fail,’ ‘I don’t want to be unhealthy,’ or ‘I don’t want to want to be poor.” (Crum, 1987)

 

Our current educational environment often contributes to ‘moving away from’ rather than moving toward a goal or a vision, even though it is often stated otherwise. The fear of failure often precludes the joy of success. The affect is not the desired outcome. Destination thinking replaces old habits with new ones, moving toward achievable and realistic success. A holistic approach includes the development and nurturing of the creative nature within the human being, at the core of our being human. An integrated system naturally addresses inherent conflict and provides tools to ascend from it, using the conflict to engage creative thinking rather than rote action.

 

Utilization of those who have gone before often stimulates positive change to a greater degree. Optimal change agents, in this case, span several areas of concern, expertise, and professional endeavors. Presentations and networking are a core competency of our sales effort; know face-to-face communication is the most productive and builds the greatest rapport. Civic organizations, angel investor groups, local and national corporations, philanthropic foundations, and various ‘Anonymous’ groups hold the capacity to capitalize on concern, holistic philosophy, professional contacts, and resources unknown. This strategy facilitates a truly Win/Win for the business units, community and participants, direct or indirect.

 

The foundational fabric of Spectrum Academy empowers the development of leaders, within the organization, the student body, and interacting with the community. The transformation of disenfranchised youth spills over into the entire environment of the Academy. The Co-Directors, examples of charismatic and transformative leaders, instill the need for achievement through progressive opportunities for the youth to do and be more than in their past living habits. This gratifies the need for personal power in the progress toward meeting goals and objectives while increasing cognitive ability, interpersonal skills, self-confidence and changes in ethics. Although the staff and peers display some managerial behaviors in this process, such as interpersonal, informational, and decisional roles, the collective leadership methodology and philosophy of the organization achieve the results.

 

Milestones

Text Box:  
Spectrum Academy Charter 
Application
Drafting Charter
Sample other charters
Get letters of support
Apply research 
Develop rough draft
Edit and finalize
Charter Approval
Pre-Operations
Detailed Plan of Operations
Establish Formal Organization
Develop Formal Operating 
Agreements
Develop Partnerships
Enlist Grant Writers
Receive Start Up Funding
Recruit/Admit Students
Recruit/Hire Staff
Secure Facility and Support 
Formalize Instructional Program
Operations
Formally Open Doors
Identify / Address Constraints
Transition Governance 
Establish Formal Relationships
Refine Curriculum & Instruction
Collect/Interpret Data
 

 

 

Text Box:  
Spectrum Academy Charter 
Application
Drafting Charter
Sample other charters
Get letters of support
Apply research 
Develop rough draft
Edit and finalize
Charter Approval
Pre-Operations
Detailed Plan of Operations
Establish Formal Organization
Develop Formal Operating 
Agreements
Develop Partnerships
Enlist Grant Writers
Receive Start Up Funding
Recruit/Admit Students
Recruit/Hire Staff
Secure Facility and Support 
Formalize Instructional Program
Operations
Formally Open Doors
Identify / Address Constraints
Transition Governance 
Establish Formal Relationships
Refine Curriculum & Instruction
Collect/Interpret Data
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

         

 

  

Management Summary

 

Organizational Structure

 

Spectrum Academy’s strategic plan denotes three specific areas within the school’s management matrix. These areas include Education, Commerce, and Community. The Education Group facilitator shares the vision and has an in-depth understanding of educational systems, including effective school administration, exemplary exceptional student services, outstanding curricula and faculty development, rapport-building student promotion and retention, and innovative information technology systems. The Commerce Group facilitator also shares the vision has an equally in-depth understanding of State and Federal laws and regulations, creating collaborative alliances, supply chain integration, sales and marketing, and information technology. The Community Group facilitator shares the vision as well and has a mastery of marketing school programs, adult education programs, grant research and writing, after-school program development, and information technology. The Co-Directors hold the vision and have an understanding and mastery of strategic planning, educational and organizational development, business administration, and information systems integration.

Communication Plan

“Communication plans should be divided into two categories: project communications and constituent communications. Project communications include the interaction that is required in order to deliver the engagement with quality. Included in this category are the project plan itself, the memos and status reports that the team distributes to one another, the team meetings, and the minutes that are issued from them. In the realm of constituent communications are the executive briefings, auditorium presentations, newsletters, "lunch and learn" sessions, posters, brochures, focus groups, and feedback mechanisms like e-mail and voicemail suggestion boxes.” (Freedman, 2000)

Best practices in pro-active management include up-to-the-minute reporting in order to anticipate and resolve problems before they have a chance to impede progress of the project. Along with the items mentioned above, we will be including e-room, net-meetings, and video-conferencing via the Internet. Technology use will be an asset of the curriculum and functioning of the school and a key feature of the process and stakeholder training. The Education, Commerce, and Community group facilitator determines the lines and types of communication necessary to serve their group, while maintaining the integrity of Spectrum’s open communication philosophy. The organizational chart has the appearance of a hierarchical structure yet, the communication lines are more flat-lined and organic in the actual workings of the organization.

 

Management Team

           

The management team is forming. Features include academic and experiential expertise that leads successful educational institutions, law firms, civic organizations, social services, and technology companies. Diversity in the core team is critical and demonstrates the holistic approach of systems-thinking.

 

Co-Director

Robin J. Engel, MAOM, BAEd

English and History Teacher, NEW SAMARITAN CHARTER HIGH SCHOOL                     Present

Construct curriculum, order supplies/texts, facilitate in-class and computer-based learning. Track progress, create remedial programs and projects, serve diverse learners. Facilitate student government development and implementation.

 

High School Teacher, CARMEL COMMUNITY ARTS & TECHNOLOGY CHARTER SCHOOL  2002-2003

Taught all core subjects plus Drama, led school’s fall and spring expositions, facilitated student product development and student-led conferences, responsible for entire high-school program and students.

 

Coordinator/Facilitator, Be the Dream Nonprofit Organization                          2000-Present

Co-founded service to address educational and youth related issues.  Selected and secured venues/ vendors.  Developed media relations, including three radio interviews.  Acquired speakers and facilitators and co-hosted seminars. Managed expenses and accounting. 

 

Lead Teacher/Science Teacher, Scottsdale Horizons Charter School              2000-2001

Assisted students in grades five through eight with their individually paced studies in various subjects.  Tracked student files, ordered supplies, conducted class meetings, organized special activities, evaluated work, and delegated tasks to two assistants.  In addition, taught afternoon science classes, developing the curriculum, ordering supplies, and modifying materials for each grade level. 

 

Substitute Teacher, Kyrene, Chandler, Gilbert, Tempe School Districts      1996-1997, 1999-2000

Taught grades pre-K through eight in all subjects.  Conducted classes with limited and sometimes vague instructions left by the full-time teacher.

 

Fifth Grade Teacher, Saguaro Elementary                                                                  1997-1999

Planned, organized, delegated, and implemented daily lessons, utilizing a variety of instructional styles, including group work, individual work, classroom lectures, hands-on instruction, private tutoring, and journal writing.  Developed consistent routines to provide clarity and enhance learning for students with diverse academic capabilities, including ESL, gifted, mildly retarded, and emotionally unstable students.

 

 

Co-Director

Bruce ‘ Zen’ Benefiel, MBA, MAOM, CHt.

Skill sets:

¥        Educating, Mentoring and Coaching – secondary and adult learners

¥        Event Development, Planning, Coordinating – small to large scale private and public events

¥        Television Production – producer/host, procurement coordinator and media buyer

¥        Supplier/Vendor Relations and Resource Integration – aerospace, events, health food industry

¥        Sales and Marketing – graphic services, health foods, home improvements, chemicals

¥        Personal Development – coach, mentor and workshop facilitator

¥        Desktop Publishing – brochures, j-cards, posters, newsletters, presentations

 

Completed Graduate Studies:

      Master of Arts in Organizational Management, University of Phoenix, Phoenix, AZ – (Oct. 03 completion)

                        Human Resources, Conflict Management, Project Planning, G.P.A. 3.94

Master of Business Administration, University of Phoenix, Phoenix, AZ – 2/97

            Project Management, Marketing, and Production, G.P.A. 3.84

Education:

BS in Business Administration, University of Phoenix, Phoenix, AZ – 11/89

            Major: Advertising, Finance and Marketing - 3.72 GPA

Secondary Teacher Certification, University of Phoenix, Phoenix, AZ – 11/98

            Business Certification - 3.95 GPA

            Hypnotherapy Certification, Southwest Institute of Healing Arts, Scottsdale, AZ – 2/98

                        Stress relief, personal growth and development – 100 hours

            Desktop Publishing Certificate, Aztech College, Tempe, AZ – 8/92

                        Adobe Illustrator, Quark, Adobe PageMaker – 100 hours

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE:

            Five years teaching at inner-city public high schools, both charter and district.

                        Self-contained special education; regular education, entire curriculum development and management.

                       

Management Team gaps

o       Education Administration Director

o       Commerce Department Director

o       Community Department Director

o       IT Professional

 

Human Resources Plan

It is reasonable to consider project team attributes to include exceptional interpersonal, analytical, problem-solving, and time management skills. No matter the product, it is the people who make everything happen. Each team member has an understanding of functional systems and current best practices in their respective fields. Documentation of all policies and procedures, as they develop, provides a consistent message for all participants, staff, and administration.

 

The functional areas of the project are three-fold. The Education area is responsible for the day-to-day operations of the school, including administration, curricula development and implementation, and staff training and development. The Commercial area is responsible for the strategic plan to meet Arizona State requirements, developing business partnerships, and product development of saleable results. The Community area is responsible for outreach programs, after school programs, and adult education opportunities. These areas all form the core of the project. It is apparent that they overlap to meet the requirements of a functional relationship. We will be introducing the term “jobarchy” as the name for this type of structure. Its three-fold relationship creates a unique and synergistic service toward meeting the needs of the job. The job is the boss and everyone wins in the end.

 

There are several provisions in the charter for Spectrum Academy that often do not apply to charter schools generally, including a requirement that the staff at the otherwise-independent charter school must receive salaries and benefits comparable with those provided in the sponsor district. Other specific items in developing the staff:

*      : Certification and Licensure

*      : Requirements for Employment

*      : Dismissal, Discipline, and Termination

*      : Schedule of Work/School Year

*      : Leaves of Absence

*      : Punctuality and Attendance

*      : Salaries and Career Advancement

*      : Employee Grievance Procedure

*      : Health and Welfare Benefits

*      : Nondiscrimination

 

I. Certification and Licensure

A. Regular Teaching Staff
Full time, regular teaching staff, further defined by the terms of the charter as "core" teachers, shall be either certified by the Arizona Department of Education with either a clear or preliminary credential or demonstrate command of classroom management and methods as determined by Director/Teacher Mentor. Teachers shall be required to pass the ATPE. However, teachers-in-training who are working toward a credential and others with specialized and appropriate experience may also be retained if their skills and abilities will further the educational mission of Spectrum Academy and if they obtain the emergency credential.

B. Non-Core Teaching Staff
Non-core teachers are not required to hold credentials but must demonstrate subject knowledge and the ability to work well with children.


C. Other Staff, Substitutes, and Consultants
All other staff must demonstrate the abilities necessary to effectively carry out their responsibilities. Applicable certifications may apply to specific areas of instruction and/or programs offered by Spectrum Academy.

D. Continuing Education

1. All teachers are expected to keep their professional training and knowledge current through ongoing courses and workshops in education. The Director will work with staff to develop professional growth plans consistent with section III.B. This may be accomplished at local colleges and universities or under whatever auspices such advanced training is available.

2. Each year all teachers shall complete at least three hours of coursework, seminars, or workshops related to professional development. The school will reimburse the teacher up to a maximum of $100 per school year if included in the school's annual budget. These hours must be approved in advance by the Director. Teachers are required to submit documentation of completed coursework in order to fulfill this requirement. Transcripts shall be provided to the school to document courses which carry university credit. For courses which do not carry university credit, teachers are required to complete the appropriate form provided the school, and have it signed by the instructor.

3. All new teachers are required to complete one approved three-hour course in cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) and one approved three-hour course in first aid during the first 60 days of employment. All continuing teachers are required to take a refresher course in both CPR and first aid. Teachers will make their own arrangements for such training and will provide documentation of completion and cost to the school. As allowed by the school's budget, the school will reimburse the teacher for the cost of the course (s) up to a maximum of $75.00 for a 6-hour CPR/First Aid course, and up to $40.00 for a CPR refresher course.

II. Requirements for Employment

A. Employees are expected to adhere to the requirements for employment described in the Spectrum Academy Charter and personnel policies.

B. Before the first day of employment, all employees must have a tuberculosis test as described in Education Code 49406. The current physician's statement must be on file in the office before the first day of employment. Failure to provide documentation on time may result in immediate termination.

C. All first year employees without credentials must submit fingerprints to the Department of Justice and Federal Bureau of Investigation for the purpose of obtaining a criminal record summary as required by Education Code Section 44237. Such fingerprints must be submitted prior to employment and are a condition of employment. Criminal record summaries will be maintained by the Director in a secured file separate from personnel files, as required by Section 44237.

D. Employees are expected to conduct themselves at all times in a manner consistent with the highest standards of personal character and professionalism, with children, parents, prospective parents, co-workers, and the community.

III. Dismissal, Discipline, and Termination

A. The Principal/Director may terminate or suspend the employment of any employee if s/he determines that the employee has failed to fulfill the duties and responsibilities and/or demonstrate the qualities outlined in the job description, or if other good cause exists. All employees will be hired on the basis of annual contracts and their terms expire at the end of their annual contract. In the event the school finds it necessary or desirable to terminate an employee's employment before the end of the school year, the school will attempt to give the employee written notice at least 10 calendar days before termination, unless the Director determines that the employee poses a threat to the health, safety, or welfare of the school or students.

B. In the event an employee finds it necessary to resign during the school year, the employee shall give written notice to the Principal/Director as soon as possible and at least 10 calendar days before the effective date of resignation.

C. In the event of termination of employment prior to the end of an employment contract, the employee shall be entitled only to the prorated salary and benefits earned through the last date of employment.

D. Any employee may submit a grievance regarding dismissal, discipline, and termination pursuant to the grievance process outlined in Section IX, below.

IV. Personnel Evaluation

A. Confidential Personnel File
The school shall maintain a confidential personnel file for each employee. The personnel file will contain the evaluation documents discussed in this section, as well as any other employment-related documents or correspondence. All documents placed in the personnel file will have been signed by all concerned parties.

B. Professional Development Portfolio
All instructional and professional staff will create and maintain a Personal Development Portfolio containing the goals and outcomes of the school and the employee's personal plan for meeting those goals and outcomes and for continuous improvement. After an initial meeting between the Director and employee at which time mutual goals are reviewed and a professional growth program is developed, the employee will create the Portfolio, and include samples of classroom or school work, personal reflections, and any other material deemed appropriate as evidence of continuous improvement.

C. Employee Observations
All employees will be observed on an ongoing basis by the Director, using both formal and informal observations. Formal observations will include a pre-observation conference as well as a post-observation conference. First-year employees shall have at least two formal observations prior to the three-month review outlined in Section D, below. Prior to the six-month review, described in Section D, at least two additional formal observations will be conducted for first-year employees. Returning staff will have three formal observations prior to the six-month review Described in Section E, below. Results of formal observations, consisting of the employee's and the Director's observations and recommendations, will be put in writing and included within the employee's own Personal Development Portfolio and the school's personnel file. Nothing in this section limits the Director from conducting observations of an informal or unannounced nature.

D. Formal Reviews - First Year Employees
For all first year employees, there shall be a formal review three months after the start of the school year. The purpose of the three-month review shall be to review the employee's self-assessment, the job description, areas of responsibility, and progress toward goals and outcomes, noting particularly good work, areas for improvement and skill development, and deficient work, and developing a clear plan for improvement. In addition, at the three-month review, the employee will provide feedback to the Director on the Director's job performance and the Director will share with the employee his/her own self-assessment. Any written feedback or self-assessment materials may be placed into the Director's personnel file. After six months from the start of the school year, a second review will be held to determine progress made toward the improvement plan. At that time, the Director will inform the employee and report to the Personnel Committee whether the school intends to continue employment for the subsequent school year. Results of these reviews will be put in writing and placed within the employee's own Personal Development Portfolio and the school's personnel file.

E. Formal Reviews - Returning Employees
For returning staff, there shall be a formal review six months after the start of the school year. The purpose of the review will be to review progress toward the employee's personal plan and professional growth program described above in Section B. In addition, the employee will provide feedback to the Director on the Director's job performance, and the Director will share with the employee his/her own self-assessment. Any written feedback and the Director's self-assessment may be placed into the Director's personnel file. At that time, the Director will inform the employee and report to the Personnel Committee whether the school intends to continue employment for the subsequent school year. Results of these reviews will be put in writing and placed within the employee's own Personal Development Portfolio and the school's personnel file.

F. Director Evaluation
The Director shall be evaluated by the Personnel Committee of the Board prior to the end of each year's contract based on criteria set forth by job responsibilities. Results shall be in writing and included in the employee's Personal Development Portfolio and personnel file. Evaluation criteria shall include interpersonal rapport, discipline issues, school board, parent, and teacher/staff interaction, fiscal reporting, and student success.

G. Response to Observation and Review Findings
All employees shall have the right to make written objections to the observations or review findings within one week of receipt by stating areas of disagreement. These objections will be attached to the observation and/or evaluation and kept in the employee's personnel file.

V. Schedule

A. All employees are required to work according to the schedule and dates stated in their employment agreements. Full-time staff are expected to be present at the school from 15 minutes prior to the beginning of the normal school day to 15 minutes after the normal school day, unless other arrangements are approved by the Director.

B. In addition, teachers are required to participate in programs related to their professional duties that may be held outside school hours. These days include teacher in-service sessions conducted within the regular work hours, staff meetings, parent-teacher-student conferences, and two informational nights. Teachers may also be required to participate in 30 hours of additional duties per year.

C. All other employees are encouraged to attend school functions and events.

D. All full-time employees shall have a minimum lunch break of 30 minutes per day.

E. Employees are required to perform yard duty as directed, before, after and during the school day.

VI. Leaves

A. Sick Leave
Sick leave is available to employees to provide for full salary and benefits for absences due to personal illness or injury that prevent the employee from working or for the following reasons:

1. Appearance in court as an interested party or under subpoena.
2. Death of an immediate family member.
3. An emergency caused by an accident or illness that requires the employee to be absent from work.

Full-time staff shall accrue sick leave at the rate of 10 days per school year. If specified in the employee's contract, part-time staff, or staff working part of the school year shall accrue sick leave on a prorated basis to reflect the proportion of time or working months that the employee's schedule represents in relation to a full time schedule. Employees may accrue up to 10 [none? more? fewer?] unused days of sick leave to be carried over across school years if their annual contract is renewed, for a total maximum accrual of 20 days of sick leave. Sick leave is granted for only the reasons listed above and will not be paid out if not utilized, if the employee is terminated, or if the employee's contract is not renewed. All employees shall inform the Director of an anticipated absence as soon as possible, and such leave (other than for unexpected circumstances) must be preapproved by the Director. The Director may require an employee to verify the claimed reason for any absence.

B. Personal Leave
The Director may grant up to two days of leave per employee per year for urgent personal business or other emergencies. Such leave shall be at full pay and benefits but with cost of substitute deducted. Such leave may not be accrued and will not be paid out for any reason if not used.

C. Long Term Leave
Long term leave shall be defined as unpaid leave for pregnancy, post-childbirth maternity or paternity, adoption, employee long-term illness, and any other reasons required by law. The school may require certification from a qualified medical professional to document the reason for the leave and/or to verify the employee's ability to return to work. Such leave shall be given for a maximum of up to 12 consecutive weeks, or longer if required by law. In no event shall such leave extend beyond the end of the employee's annual contract unless the contract is renewed. Such leave is available to full-time staff only who have been employed for at least one full school year. Any health benefits provided to the employee by the school will continue to be provided during this leave. Whenever possible, such leave must be pre-approved by the Director and at least 30 days advance notice shall be given by the employee.

D. Jury Duty
Upon notification by a court to report for jury duty, the employee shall immediately request jury duty during non-school months. In the event this request is not granted, time off with no loss of salary limited to two (2) weeks will be provided for jury duty required to be served during the school year. Any employee, when advised of his/her notification of jury duty, must immediately inform the Director. Salary will be paid as usual, and the check for juror fees is to be signed over to the school.

E. Professional Development Leave
Full-time employees are entitled to the equivalent of one paid day during the school year for training purposes. Such training must be approved by the Director in advance. See Section I (D) above.

VII. Punctuality and Attendance

Any employee who is unable to report for work on any particular day must call the Director at least one hour before the start of the scheduled work day. If an employees fails to report to work without notification to the Director, the school may consider that employee has abandoned his/her employment and has voluntarily terminated the employment. In such cases, the School must provide notice to the employee of the decision, and the employee may file a grievance pursuant to the process outlined in Section IX below if the employee disputes the decision.

Upon returning to work after an absence for any reason, the employee must complete an absence form and turn it in to the Director by the end of the work day on which the employee returns. If an employee is absent for medical reasons for more than 10 working days, the employee must, immediately upon his or her intended day of return to work, provide the Director with a physician's statement certifying that the employee may return.

VIII. Salaries

The Director shall propose salary rates in accordance with the terms of the Charter and will present them for approval to the Personnel Committee.

IX. Employee Grievance Procedure

 

A. In the event of a dispute involving employment or the implementation of the personnel policies, and after a good faith effort with the supervisor to thoroughly resolve the dispute, all employees may submit their complaint following the procedures outlined below. The good faith effort will include problem identification, possible solutions, selection of resolution, timeline for implementation, and follow-up. A written summary of the good faith effort will be included in the personnel file. Failure to follow the procedures and timelines below constitutes a waiver of the employee's right to grieve.

1. The employee may submit his/her grievance in writing to the Chair of the Personnel Committee within five days of a failed good faith effort to resolve the dispute.

2. Within ten working days of receipt of the written complaint, the Personnel Committee shall schedule a hearing at a mutually convenient time and place for discussion of the complaint with all parties involved, but in no event later than 20 days after receipt of the written complaint and after notification to the employee. Personnel Committee members who are interested parties shall excuse themselves from grievance proceedings if such members have a conflict of interest in the subject of the proceedings.

3. A decision as established by a majority vote of the members of the Personnel Committee hearing the grievance shall be rendered within five working days of the completion of the hearing. Any such proceedings shall be conducted in closed session, unless requested otherwise by the employee. In the event that additional information, investigation, or hearings are necessary after the initial hearing, the hearing may be continued and the final decision shall be made within five working days of the last committee hearing, or as soon thereafter as is practicable. Any additional proceedings shall be completed as soon a practical.

4. The decision of the Personnel Committee shall be final unless appealed by the employee to the Board of Directors, which may review and modify the decision of the Personnel Committee if it finds that the Committee failed to properly follow the grievance process described above. A request for an appeal may be submitted to the Chairperson or President of the Board within five days of the decision of the Personnel Committee. After receiving an appeal request, the Chairperson or President shall schedule a meeting to consider such an appeal at soon as practical. Board members who are interested parties, as defined in the Bylaws, shall excuse themselves from reviews of Personnel Committee decisions to the extent permitted under law. Any such proceedings shall be conducted in closed session, unless requested otherwise by the employee.

X. Health and Welfare Benefits

Health Benefits
Spectrum Academy will attempt to provide health, dental, and vision insurance coverage for current staff that is reasonably comparable with coverage provided by the sponsor district to its employees, provided such coverage is commercially or otherwise available at reasonable cost. The Charter School will pay the cost of such coverage for full time employees. Part time employees may also request such coverage and the cost of such coverage will be prorated between the School and the Employee. The School contribution shall represent the proportion the hours worked by the employee bears to a full-time equivalent position. No staff member will receive paid health benefits beyond their term of employment.

Welfare Benefits
Spectrum Academy will attempt to secure State Teachers Retirement System eligibility for all eligible core teachers and will pay the required employer contribution for such benefits if available and to the extent requested by the employee. Spectrum Academy will also attempt to secure Public Employees Retirement System eligibility for all eligible staff and make the required employer contribution for such benefits, if available and to the extent requested by the employee. Spectrum Academy will make the required employer contribution toward Social Security for those employees not covered by STRS.

XI. Nondiscrimination

The Charter School does not discriminate in any personnel matters or in the provision of programs and services on any basis prohibited by law. Any employee who has been the subject of discrimination or harassment may bring questions, concerns, and/or complaints to either the Director or the Chair of the Personnel Committee.

 

Governing Body – Temporary Board

            Jerome Landau, JD

            Tim Meuret, Ph.D.

            Sandra McFarland, MAEd

            Robert “Standing Bear” Craig

            Ronald Sease, MAEd

            Marianne Carroll

           

 Conflict Resolution Plan

A holistic environment that addresses a variety of areas is of considerable worth to stakeholders, especially the consumers who do not realize its potential worth. According to Thomas Crum in The Magic of Conflict, “Conflict is natural neither positive nor negative, it just is. Conflict is just an interference pattern of energies. It’s not whether you have conflict in your life. It’s what you do with that conflict that makes a difference.” An University of Iowa study revealed that the national average of parent-to-child criticisms is 12 to 1 – that is, 12 criticisms to 1 compliment. The ratio of criticism to compliments in secondary schools is 18 to 1 between teacher and student. Spectrum Academy’s plan is to change this pattern through a peer-mediation program that works for staff and students. Demonstrating natural consequences in a holistic model is implemented through the discovery of communication needs, while using alternative dispute resolution protocols to learn new skills. A simple flowchart demonstrates the process, which is followed by a sample template.

 

Conflict resolution program chart

                Conflict Analysis & Planning Template

1. What is the history of the conflict?   What is currently happening?

2. What is your real need (interest) underneath your position?  What is driving your attempt to win your position?  If you have more than one interest, how would you prioritize them?

3. What do you think the other person's perspective is of the conflict?

4. What do you think is their real need (interest) underneath their position?  What do you think is driving their attempt to win their position?  If you think they have more than one interest, how would you prioritize them?

5. What is your BATNA (Best Alternative To Negotiated Agreement)?  How can you strengthen it?

6. What do you think their BATNA is?

7. Do you foresee any problems pertaining to your feelings/reflexive conflict behavior that could arise during the discussion?  What can you do to prevent potential problems?

8. Do you foresee any problems pertaining to their feelings/reflexive conflict behavior that could arise during the discussion?  What can you to do overcome these problems if they occur?

9. Are there any objective criteria you could use upon which to base your solution?   What are they?

 

Finance Plan

Key Assumptions Used in Forecasting

Key Variables

 

 

 

 

 

 

Number of Students

 

 

100

 

 

Number of teachers

 

 

10

 

 

Number of administrators

 

1.5

 

 

Number of support staff

 

1.5

 

 

Number of SPED/bilingual staff

 

1.5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Students per teacher

 

 

15

 

 

Students per administrator

 

100

 

 

Students per support staff

 

100

 

 

Students per SPED/bilingual staff

 

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salary: Teacher

 

 

$30,000

 

 

Salary: Administrator

 

 

$50,000

 

 

Salary: Support Staff

 

 

$25,000

 

 

Salary: SPED/bilingual

 

 

$30,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Payment per student

 

 

$4,600

 

 

Fees per student

 

 

$100

 

 

Entitlements per student

 

$500

 

 

Total principal owed- beg. of fiscal year

$55,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes

 

 

 

 

 

 

     * No interscholastic sports

 

 

 

 

     * No transportation to/from school

 

 

Key Financial Indicators

Start-up Budget

Spectrum Academy

Start-up Budget

 

Avg. Monthly Amount

 

Months

No.

Total

Operating Revenue

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Expenses

 

 

 

 

 

 

     Teachers

 

$2,750

 

2

10

$55,000

     Administration

 

$4,167

 

4

2

$33,336

     Support Staff

 

$1,500

 

4

2

$12,000

Subtotal

 

 

 

 

 

$100,336

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Services and Activities

 

 

 

 

 

     Custodial Services

 

$750

 

4

1

$3,000

     Security

 

$500

 

4

1

$2,000

     Telephone

 

$500

 

4

1

$2,000

     Web hosting

 

$250

 

4

1

$1,000

Subtotal

 

 

 

 

 

$8,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Supplies and Equipment

 

 

 

 

 

     Furniture

 

 

 

 

 

$20,000

     Computers

 

 

 

 

35

$20,000

     Software

 

 

 

 

 

$30,000

     Textbooks

 

 

 

 

300

$15,000

Subtotal

 

 

 

 

 

$85,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Marketing and Development

 

 

 

 

 

     Printing

 

 

 

 

 

$5,000

     Advertising

 

 

 

 

 

$10,000

Subtotal

 

 

 

 

 

$15,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Physical Plant

 

 

 

 

 

 

     Renovations

 

 

 

 

 

$50,000

     Rent

 

$7,500

 

4

 

$30,000

     Utilities

 

$2,500

 

4

 

$10,000

Subtotal

 

 

 

 

 

$90,000

Total Expenses

 

 

 

 

 

$298,336

Excess (Deficit)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants and Loans

 

 

 

 

 

 

     Government Start-Up Grant

 

 

 

 

$50,000

     Private Grants

 

 

 

 

 

$200,000

     Loans

 

 

 

 

 

$50,000

Subtotal

 

 

 

 

 

$300,000

Ending Fund Balance

 

 

 

 

 

$1,664

 

Operating Budget – Year 1

Operating Revenue Year 1

 

Total

 

Assumptions/Notes

 

Per Pupil Revenue

 

 

$500,000

 

$5000 per student (100 students)

Fees

 

 

 

$10,000

 

$100 per student (100 students)

Student Entitlements

 

 

$50,000

 

$500 per student (100 students)

Federal Programs

 

 

$250,000

 

Estimate

 

 

Grants

 

 

 

$200,000

 

Estimate

 

 

Donations

 

 

 

$50,000

 

Estimate

 

 

Loan

 

 

 

$50,000

 

Estimate

 

 

Stimulus Fund

 

 

 

 

AZ legislature currently has no allocations

Total Revenue

 

 

$1,110,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Expenses

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salaries and Benefits

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

     Salary - Teachers

 

 

$210,000

 

$30,000 per teacher (7 teachers)

     Salary - Administrators

 

$75,000

 

$50,000 per (1.5 administrators)

     Salarey - Support Staff

 

$37,500

 

$25,000 per (1.5 support staff)

     Salary - SPED/Bilingual Staff

 

$49,500

 

$33,000 per (1.5 SPED/Biling.)

     Benefits - Health

 

 

$72,500

 

$5,000 per (11.5 staff members)

     Benefits - FICA

 

 

$27,900

 

7.5% of total salaries

 

     Benefits - Worker's Comp.

 

$4,690

 

2.0% of total salaries

 

     Benefits - Medicare

 

 

$2,717

 

1.45% of total salaries

 

     Staff Development

 

 

$5,750

 

$500 per staff member (11.5 staff)

Subtotal

 

 

 

$485,557

 

51.3% of total

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Services and Activities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

     Special Education/Guidance

 

$30,000

 

$300 per student (100 students)

     Health

 

 

 

$15,000

 

$150 per student (100 students)

     Custodial

 

 

$20,000

 

Flat fee

 

 

     Transportation

 

 

$10,000

 

$100 per student (100 students)

     Media

 

 

 

$50,000

 

$50 per student (100 students)

     Food

 

 

 

$30,000

 

$300 per student (100 students)

     Accounting

 

 

$8,000

 

Flat fee

 

 

     Insurance

 

 

$10,000

 

$100 per student (100 students)

     Telephone

 

 

$6,000

 

$500 per month

 

     Postage and Shipping

 

$5,000

 

$50 per student (100 students)

     Physical Education/Extracurricular Activities

$10,000

 

$100 per student (100 students)

Subtotal

 

 

 

$194,000

 

17.2% of total

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Supplies and Equipment

 

 

 

 

 

 

     Supplies - Instructional

 

$30,000

 

$300 per student (100 students)

     Supplies - Administrative

 

$3,000

 

$2000 per (1.5 administrators)

     Supplies - General

 

 

$10,000

 

$100 per student (100 students)

     Computers

 

 

$67,500

 

$1500 per computer (45 computers)

     Furniture

 

 

$10,000

 

$100 per student (100 students)

     Athletic Equipment

 

 

$10,000

 

$100 per student (100 students)

     Other Equipment

 

 

$5,000

 

$50 per student (100 students)

Subtotal

 

 

 

$135,500

 

10.9% of total

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Marketing and Development

 

 

 

 

 

 

     Printing

 

 

 

$2,500

 

Flat fee

 

 

     Advertising

 

 

$5,000

 

Flat fee

 

 

Subtotal

 

 

 

$7,500

 

.63% of total

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Physical Utilities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

     Rent

 

 

 

$195,000

 

$13 per sq. ft. (15,000 sq. ft.)

     Utilities

 

 

 

$30,000

 

Estimate @ $2,500 per month

     Maintenance and Repair

 

$10,000

 

Flat fee

 

 

     Renovations

 

 

$15,000

 

Improvements on existing

Subtotal

 

 

 

$250,000

 

20% of total

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Loan Repayments

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

     Debt Service

 

 

$4,400

 

8% int. rate ($55,000 avg. debt)

     Principal

 

 

$9,320

 

 

 

 

Subtotal

 

 

 

$13,720

 

1.4% of total

 

Total Expenses

 

 

$1,072,557

 

 

 

 

EXCESS (DEFICIT)

 

 

$37,443

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Beginning Fund Balance from Previous Period

$1,664

 

 

 

 

Ending Fund Balance

 

 

$39,107

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating Budget - Year 2

Operating Revenue Year 2

 

Total

 

Assumptions/Notes

Per Pupil Revenue

 

 

$750,000

 

$5000 per student (150 students)

Fees

 

 

 

$15,000

 

$100 per student (150 students)

Student Entitlements

 

 

$75,000

 

$500 per student (150 students)

Federal Programs

 

 

$200,000

 

Estimate

 

Grants

 

 

 

$200,000

 

Estimate

 

Donations

 

 

 

$50,000

 

Estimate

 

Stimulus Fund

 

 

 

 

AZ legislature currently has no allocations

Total Revenue

 

 

$1,290,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Expenses

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salaries and Benefits

 

 

 

 

 

 

     Salary - Teachers

 

 

$330,000

 

$33,000 per teacher (10 teachers)

     Salary - Administrators

 

$75,000

 

$50,000 per (1.5 administrators)

     Salarey - Support Staff

 

$37,500

 

$25,000 per (1.5 support staff)

     Salary - SPED/Bilingual Staff

 

$49,500

 

$33,000 per (1.5 SPED/Biling.)

     Benefits - Health

 

 

$72,500

 

$5,000 per (14.5 staff members)

     Benefits - FICA

 

 

$36,900

 

7.5% of total salaries

     Benefits - Worker's Comp.

 

$4,690

 

2.0% of total salaries

     Benefits - Medicare

 

 

$2,848

 

1.45% of total salaries

     Staff Development

 

 

$7,250

 

$500 per staff member (14.5 staff)

Subtotal

 

 

 

$616,188

 

51.3% of total

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Services and Activities

 

 

 

 

 

 

     Special Education/Guidance

 

$45,000

 

$300 per student (150 students)

     Health

 

 

 

$22,500

 

$150 per student (150 students)

     Custodial

 

 

$20,000

 

Flat fee

 

     Transportation

 

 

$15,000

 

$100 per student (150 students)

     Media

 

 

 

$7,500

 

$50 per student (150 students)

     Food

 

 

 

$45,000

 

$300 per student (150 students)

     Accounting

 

 

$8,000

 

Flat fee

 

     Insurance

 

 

$15,000

 

$100 per student (150 students)

     Telephone

 

 

$6,000

 

$500 per month

     Postage and Shipping

 

$7,500

 

$50 per student (150 students)

     Physical Education/Extracurricular Activities

$15,000

 

$100 per student (150 students)

Subtotal

 

 

 

$206,500

 

17.2% of total

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Supplies and Equipment

 

 

 

 

 

     Supplies - Instructional

 

$45,000

 

$300 per student (150 students)

     Supplies - Administrative

 

$3,000

 

$2000 per (1.5 administrators)

     Supplies - General

 

 

$15,000

 

$100 per student (150 students)

     Computers

 

 

$22,500

 

$1500 per computer (15 computers)

     Furniture

 

 

$15,000

 

$100 per student (150 students)

     Athletic Equipment

 

 

$15,000

 

$100 per student (150 students)

     Other Equipment

 

 

$7,500

 

$50 per student (150 students)

Subtotal

 

 

 

$123,000

 

10.9% of total

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Marketing and Development

 

 

 

 

 

     Printing

 

 

 

$2,500

 

Flat fee

 

     Advertising

 

 

$5,000

 

Flat fee

 

Subtotal

 

 

 

$7,500

 

.63% of total

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Physical Utilities

 

 

 

 

 

 

     Rent

 

 

 

$195,000

 

$13 per sq. ft. (15,000 sq. ft.)

     Utilities

 

 

 

$30,000

 

Estimate @ $2,500 per month

     Maintenance and Repair

 

$10,000

 

Flat fee

 

     Renovations

 

 

$15,000

 

Improvements on existing

Subtotal

 

 

 

$250,000

 

20% of total

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Loan Repayments

 

 

 

 

 

 

     Debt Service

 

 

$4,400

 

8% int. rate ($55,000 avg. debt)

     Principal

 

 

$9,320

 

 

 

Subtotal

 

 

 

$13,720

 

1.4% of total

Total Expenses

 

 

$1,203,188

 

 

 

EXCESS (DEFICIT)

 

 

$86,812

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Beginning Fund Balance from Previous Period

$39,107

 

 

 

Ending Fund Balance

 

 

$125,919

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating Budget - Year 3

Operating Revenue Year 3

 

Total

 

Assumptions/Notes

Per Pupil Revenue

 

 

$1,100,000

 

$5500 per student (200 students)

Fees

 

 

 

$20,000

 

$100 per student (200 students)

Student Entitlements

 

 

$100,000

 

$500 per student (200 students)

Federal Programs

 

 

$200,000

 

Estimate

 

Grants

 

 

 

$200,000

 

Estimate

 

Donations

 

 

 

$50,000

 

Estimate

 

Total Revenue

 

 

$1,670,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Expenses

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salaries and Benefits

 

 

 

 

 

 

     Salary - Teachers

 

 

$462,000

 

$33,000 per teacher (14 teachers)

     Salary - Administrators

 

$75,000

 

$50,000 per (1.5 administrators)

     Salarey - Support Staff

 

$50,000

 

$25,000 per (2 support staff)

     Salary - SPED/Bilingual Staff

 

$66,000

 

$33,000 per (2 SPED/Biling.)

     Benefits - Health

 

 

$87,500

 

$5,000 per (17.5 staff members)

     Benefits - FICA

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